The mid-year update

So it’s been a hot minute. (Or several, as we’re in our typical hot and oh-so-humid part of the summer. But I’ve got several things to show, so it’s catch up time. I’ve been putting this off because of the struggle of getting good photos, but let’s face it, I’m not in a life stage where I can prioritize that. Here goes with the very imperfect ones I’ve gotten.

The first, finished back in March, is a return of an old favorite TNT pattern, the Sewaholic Renfrew tee. I used an Art Gallery knit that’s been in my stash for some time, and it doesn’t have quite the recovery that I’d wish for the bands. But it does go well with the colored denim jeans in my wardrobe. It also took a lot less fabric than I thought, so I still have about half a yard of fabric left to use!

My most involved project lately was this dress for my daughter. I used McCall’s 8267, with a few modifications. I made the 4T size, so it’ll fit her for awhile, but it ended up being extremely long on her. So I shortened the sleeves and hand-stitched two tucks into the skirt. The theory is that I can take them out as she gets taller.

The second modification was to add pockets! I put them in the side seams, just free-handing a pattern piece. And I think that just might be her favorite feature, because she calls it “my oonicorn dess wif the pockets.”

The construction wasn’t difficult, just a little time consuming with the appliqué and making sure the mane pieces for the skirt lined up with it. I wasn’t sure at first if it was worth the effort, since she seemed happy to look at it but completely uninterested in wearing it. But once I finally did convince her to try it on, about a week or so after finishing the tucks— and after she discovered the pockets— she really did end up liking it! She frequently grabs it out of her closet when it’s clean, so I’m feeling much better about taking another attempt at kids’ clothes.

After that, I made three different views of the Santa Fe top by Hey June Handmade. The first was using most of the leftover blue fabric, and some of the white, from the unicorn dress.

The second was from a flamingo print and coordinating solid that my mom recently passed on to me. She’s been babysitting my niece full time, and so she’s been getting even less sewing time than me. I wasn’t sure how this one would turn out, since the knit was heavier and less drapey than the other two pieces, but it seems to sit fine. My husband has commented a few times that he particularly likes this one.

It’s all about the bathroom selfies with this pattern, apparently.

The final is a second tie-dye print. I bought this one last year as part of the big 40th birthday haul, intending to sew it up. But then Halloween costumes took longer than I thought and I didn’t get to it. So I’m glad to have it done this year.

Except for the shot with my oldest’s tinkering supplies in the background. This is as good as it gets here.

I’ll do the final project for now as a separate post, because it needs a little more explanation. And this post is already pretty long.

First make of 2022: The Jasper

My one-garment-a-month streak continues. I did finish this one in January, but it took a little longer to get the photos. Anyway, here it is!

With my toddler helper, of course.

This is the Jasper sweatshirt by Paprika Patterns. It was hugely popular when it came out several years back, but if you’ve been here for awhile, you know that I very rarely get to a pattern until the train has been gone for some time! I’ve actually had the fabric (a rayon sweatshirting that is so soft) and pattern for around five years, as I’d seen it as a pattern that was hackable for nursing. I just didn’t manage to get to it until well after that baby (and the next) was born. I think it worked out for the best, though, as then I’d feel like I’d have to alter it to remove the zippers and this way has more longevity.

I made a size 7 for the top, graded up in the hips. I don’t know exactly how far, as the 7 was the largest size in my printed pattern and I just used the measurements between that and the next size down as a guideline for how much to add, but it worked out mostly well. I forgot to factor that in to the wedge between the welt pocket opening and the side panel, so it’s got a bit of a strange shape there, but let’s just say that’s a design detail. The fit is good, and that’s the most important thing here.

I’m trying to get my stash down to a more manageable level, which is likely going to take a long time if I keep averaging one garment a month. (It’ll be easier when the kids are older, right?) So I pulled out some leftovers to finish this. The pocket lining is from a Plantain tee that I made several years ago, and the button was salvaged from one of my old jackets that I outgrew. I still have two or three of those left, I think, so hopefully I can come up with a worthy jacket at some point!

Overall, the instructions were easy to follow. I’ll admit that I was skeptical of how the pocket would work out, likely since all of my sewing time doesn’t happen until at least 8:30 after a long day of homeschooling and everything else. My brain is kind of fried by then. But it came together nicely, and I’m happy to have a bright, cozy new thing to wear during the rest of the winter.

I haven’t forgotten about the wardrobe chains, and I’m hoping that my next project will be a good start to the next one. I just need to get it traced and cut so I can start! Which is the part that always delays me.

Chain Reaction 1, finished!

Since I didn’t manage to get pictures of my fourth finished piece before I finished my most recent project, I have two things to share today.

The first is a pattern that I’ve made before, the Stasia Tee by Sew Liberated. Since I’ve already talked about this pattern, I made it basically the exact same way as before, except I did add a little extra width to the lower section to compensate for the mom tummy that I’ve gained since the ivory version. I made a coral tee years ago, and it ended up being a surprisingly versatile piece in my wardrobe. But given that it was two kids and a quarantine ago, it isn’t fitting that well these days. So this one was to function as both a replacement for that, and a much needed pop of color in this particular chain.

I had quite a bit of this coral left over, so I did make a second little side project, which I’ll put in a different post soon.

The second project, and what I believe will be the last piece in this particular chain for now, was the Carlsbad Vest from the recently released Itch to Stitch book. As you know, I’ve become quite a fan of her patterns in recent years, and I can honestly say that I want to make every single pattern in this book! Which I haven’t been able to say about other pattern books that I’ve acquired in the past. To be honest, this vest wasn’t on my immediate radar, but I found a fabric during my birthday mini-shopping spree that I thought would be perfect for it. And since it happened to work with the pieces in this chain, I just went for it!

The fabric is a double-sided knit from Joann’s — black and white stripes on one side, and white dots on black for the reverse. Initially, I was wondering if I could make this fully reversible, but that’s a lot of flat-felling on a stretchy knit. So in the end, I decided it wasn’t worth the risk of rippling all the seams. I did think that the reversible quality would make for a fun contrast with the waterfall effect of the front, and I do believe it worked out well. I also ended up using the dotted side for the arm bindings — partially for the style, but also because this knit was surprisingly hard to cut straight and all of my stripes for those pieces ended up slanted!

I made the size 14– I probably could have done the 12, but I wanted to make sure that it wasn’t pulling over my hips. The instructions were really nicely done for the mitered corners and the collar, so I had no trouble sewing this together. Honestly, the part that took the longest was the hemming, since it’s on all four sides and the way the corners are constructed made me think that my coverstitch machine wouldn’t be the best finishing choice. I ended up doing a folded hem (as per the instructions), with a narrow zigzag and tear-away stabilizer. It worked like a dream, with nary a ripple in sight, except the ones that are supposed to be in the front from that long rectangular piece. I could see myself making this again as an alternate silhouette to the Blackwood Cardigan, with a nice drapey knit.

And now, here’s how all five pieces in this chain mix together! As a reminder, the other three patterns involved are the Itch to Stitch Mountain View Jeans, the Itch to Stitch Atenas Jeans Jacket, and the Paprika Patterns Jade Skirt.

So, six looks from five pieces, which I can likely mix up more with different shoes (though my choices are admittedly limited there), or jewelry. Especially once I get to the point where Miss Grabby Toddler lets me start using my necklaces and dangly earrings again!

Overall, I’m quite pleased with how this chain-style sewing experiment worked out! My plan is to take a brief break from that for another project (I very badly need some pajamas that are between flannel pants and summer shorts), but plans for the next chain are definitely in the works. And, of course, I’m fully planning on mixing these pieces in with other things in my closet/future sewing projects as much as possible!

The Chemainus Event

For my most recent finished project (finished in October, I just haven’t gotten around to adding the pictures until now), I did something unusual for me — I got so smitten by a newly released pattern that I bought it and sewed it up almost immediately. Or, at least what passes for immediately in my slow sewing world!

My one decent photo that I managed before the minions showed up…

The pattern is the Chemainus top, from Itch to Stitch. I think that by this point, I can safely call ItS my favorite current indie pattern company. It’s nice to have one again, since I haven’t fangirled so regularly over any pattern company since Sewaholic essentially vanished overnight. I’ve been wanting something along the lines of a loose woven tee for awhile, and this one caught my eye for both the pattern/ color blocking possibilities, and the nursing friendliness. (Of course, by the time I finished, Baby Girl was weaned! But I’m admittedly not sorry to be done with that life stage.)

Also pre-haircut, since by this point, I hadn’t managed one in about 13 months.

One thing that did slow me down a bit was that my finished top is my second attempt. I initially decided to play with this border print crepe that a friend gifted me with ages ago, thinking that it might work well to highlight the print. I was hoping that it would show more of the black, gray, and ivory. It didn’t work out that great, though. The polyester refused to hold a press for the neck binding, which made it quite fiddly. And when I tried it on, aside from sizing issues, all I could see was the taupe framing my face. Now, I have very strong feelings about taupe, and none of them are positive. So I called it a wearable muslin and moved on.

And the photobombing begins!

For my second try, I used a rayon challis that I’d bought for a dress years ago, but never got to. It’s probably for the best, because I would have had to fully line it if there had been a skirt involved, but as a top it doesn’t seem too sheer.

In the crepe version, I graded two sizes larger for the hips, based on my measurements. That turned out to be huge, so I slimmed it down approximately one size in the rayon. I ended up having to rip a large section of the side seams out and take it in even further. Also, oddly, the dart placement seemed fine in the first version, but I had to move it up nearly 2″ in the second one! (Which was admittedly good for my ego, after 3 rounds of breastfeeding.) That meant the top leg of the dart is basically in the armpit curve now, but it’s probably one of those things that only I notice when it’s on. It’s not affecting the comfort, so I’ll roll with it.

Overall, I like this pattern enough to keep playing with it, though that will likely wait for warmer weather plans. I think it’ll be a nice breezy style for wovens for our hot and humid days. And there’s definitely fun potential for stripe placement, though I botched that on this one. (Note to self, cut on the regular grain instead of the cross.) I think next time, I’ll do an entire size smaller overall, and check the dart placement again. I’m also considering both narrowing and shortening the placket. As it is, it’s ending at my navel, so I think it could benefit from going an entire button shorter.

I do have some leftover yardage that I need to figure out a plan for, too. I don’t think this will be a good candidate for a mommy and me look, given that my daughter has steamrolled into the toddler stage over the last few months, and a basically white dress would never survive her messy ways!

Just in time for early spring…

(Note: I wrote this post before the the pandemic stated shutting everything down, I just hadn’t had a chance to add the pictures. My computer time is currently very limited, as my husband is working from home, so I’m just doing the best I can to finish this on my phone. Stay well, everyone. (And stay home!)

I finished a snuggly flannel shirt that I may or may not get to wear again this season. (It’s been hovering in the 50s and 60s since the beginning of the month!)

The details: I cut a size 10 in the bust, with a DD cup size, and graded to a 14 in the hips. I’m having to accept that after 3 babies, this is just my new normal! I also added an extra inch of length to the sleeves, as has been my normal for pretty much my entire sewing life. I added an extra button to the placket, since 3 just was not enough for where I had to center it. Aside from that and the plaid matching, which was a minor fail on one sleeve, it was pretty straightforward. I do wish that I’d put the pocket lower, it looks oddly high on me (thanks, nursing and gravity), but I’m not bothered enough to take the time to move it.

The pattern is the Mila shirt, from Itch to Stitch, since I’m apparently fangirling over her patterns like I used to do with Sewaholic back in the day. It’s made from a rather cozy flannel plaid, I think maybe a Kaufman, but I’m not 100% sure since this was a Christmas gift from my mom during the massive stash build of 2018. I’m much more pleased with how my size guesstimate turned out here, since this was also a shirt that I cut out while pregnant.

I was really happy with her instructions overall. The bottom of the placket was a bit fiddly, and probably would have worked better in a thinner fabric, but the burrito yoke was magic. I’ve tried the technique before, but it worked so much better on this one. So much so, that I’m reusing the instructions to add a facing on my current project! I also really like how the collar turned out, and I’m glad that I used the sleeve tabs (also to be reused on the current project), as I think that will give me a better chance of wearing it into the spring. Really, my only true regret with this project is that it took me 6 weeks to get through it all, but that can’t be helped with my current limits. I think that once I get through the projects that I’m currently making, I’m going to have to seriously consider sewing a season ahead of the current one. Depending on my wardrobe needs, I may just skip the summer clothes this year and dive right into some fallish things!

A Fine Feathered Visby

My first 2020 project is in the books! This is the Visby Henley from Itch to Stitch. I’m hoping to start doing better at utilizing my Pattern Review account this year, so here’s my official review:

Pattern Description:
From the website: “The Visby Henley & Top will become your favorite wardrobe staple. Wear this long sleeve pullover by itself on a warm day, or as a base layer underneath a snuggly sweater on a cool night. The Visby comes as a classic henley, but you also have the option to add a hood or skip the buttoned placket altogether. You also have the choice to add a bottom band!”

Pattern Sizing: 0-20. I made a 14, graded to 16 in the hips.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it? Yes

Were the instructions easy to follow? Yes! The biggest struggle I had was with the placket, as the length ended up being over an inch off from where the slit was cut to. But that easily could have been user error rather than a drafting error, as having a baby around means I’m rather tired all the time.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern? What I like: The length of the shirt is great, especially for not riding up too far when I’m having to get down on the floor. The cuffs are a stylish touch, and overall, the shirt is very comfortable. As mentioned, I did have a small struggle with the placket, but since this shirt also has a plain front and a hoodie view, I don’t think that’s enough to stop making this one.

Fabric Used: Two fairly heavy cotton jerseys. I’m fairly certain the bird one is Art Gallery.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made: As mentioned, I did grade the hips out one size, and I also lengthened the arms about 1″ (a standard change for me). I also sewed the buttons on non-functionally, because once I realized that the placket wouldn’t look right if I made it deep enough to be nursing friendly, I didn’t want to bother sewing buttonholes into jersey.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others? Yes, and yes.

Conclusion: A nice wardrobe builder tee, with lots of potential for fun fabric mixing.

Now for a few unofficial thoughts:

  • I really do think I’d make this again, as I like the raglan style and don’t have much else in my wardrobe that fits that for a tee. But whenever I do get around to making a second one, I think I may size down in the bust and sleeves. I guessed at my sizing based on previous nursing-era measurements while I was cutting this out, since I was still pregnant at the time, and I do feel like it’s a little too baggy up top.
  • I know there’s a giant swayback puddling in the back, but that’s just my figure, and it’s not something that bothers me so much that I’m going to do a lot of fiddling with darts in a knit tee.
  • The disapproving-looking owl right there near the back makes me happy.
  • I really need to work on my model poses, don’t I? I actually had someone to take the pictures this time (my husband), and he was just snapping at random while I didn’t know when the pictures were being taken. Thus the “staring epically into the distance” pose, since it was honestly the best one.

An Ottobre trio

I’ve had to be very intentional about it, but I’m still managing to find some time to sew! I spent the first month or so after my daughter was born making something for each of the kids, to give my body some time to recover and find a new normal before trying to fit something on it again. Both patterns used were from my tiny stash of Ottobre kids’ magazines.

IMG_7930.JPGFirst up, my daughter got the Wild Cat hooded tunic from the Spring 2015 issue. I made it from some scraps of a hatchi sweater knit that my mom recently used for one of her projects, since I cut this out while still pregnant and it was more readily available than digging through my own scraps! Construction was easy, with the main challenge being the invisible zipper on a bound edge. It was a good opportunity to practice finishing edges with fold over elastic, since I haven’t worked with that often. I made the smallest size for this (92 cm), and this is her wearing it at around 3 weeks old. She’s about 2.5 months old now, and while it fits her much better, I think there’s at least a month left in it now. EDIT TO ADD: I just noticed that I forgot to add the photo! (Thanks, sleep deprivation.) So this is actually her wearing it for her 3 month old photos. I have plans to make this again soon, as my older son declared that she needs a Little Red Riding Hood outfit to go with what I made for them. So I got some crushed red velvet and will probably make the next size up to be her first Christmas outfit. My family is aaaaall casual when it comes to Christmas gatherings. So this over a onesie and leggings will be perfect. I’m thinking I may tweak the front to avoid the zipper, though, since I’ve been struggling with how to finish those edges without making it look cheap.

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I made the boys’ shirts primarily with the younger one in mind. He has had a months-long obsession with stories involving the Big Bad Wolf, and it’s not uncommon to overhear him standing at the bathroom door while his brother is in there, yelling “little pig, little pig, let me in!” So when I saw this “Small Nice Wolf” shirt in the Autumn 2015 issue, I knew it had to happen. I had to purchase new for these, as I don’t have much gray in my stash, and knew the only shot at my oldest wearing it was to make it as soft of a fabric as possible. But I was able to use scraps for the face.

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Construction wasn’t bad, particularly since I took the time to baste the curvier seams before sewing. Good thing, too, since a few pieces got mixed up between the two sizes while they were sitting on my machine, and I initially sewed the smaller side front to the larger wolf face! The one thing I’d change is to secure the 3D ears better, because they tend to flop down during wear.

I think the end result is simply adorable, and Padawan was quite excited about the results! He has worn it several times since. I’ve had a little more trouble getting Hobbit to wear it, despite him asking me several times while I was recovering from having his sister if I’d started making his shirt yet. He has worn it a few times, and gets excited when he gets compliments on it, but getting him to put it on initially can be a struggle. He does like to have things a certain way, and he did admit to me today that it bothers him that the ears flop down when it’s being worn. So I think I’m going to have to go back and hand-tack the ears to the shoulders on both shirts.

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The best shot I was able to get of both of them wearing it. (I asked them to howl, and they enjoyed that part.) I have enough left that I can make them each a pair of pants, but I think I’m going to hold off on that. I’m feeling a little wary of sewing for Hobbit in particular right now, after the limited success of this shirt and what was basically a failure on the matching vests I made for them and their daddy. But I think maybe they’re warming up to my sewing for them again, as they’ve also renewed interest in the animal coats that I made for them last fall. (They still fit, since they were designed to be worn for 2 years, but it’s pretty obvious that neither of them will be able to wear them again next fall.) So we’ll see. I do have some knit panels on order for each of the kids, so I’ll need to decide whether to risk sewing for the boys again, or just make them into pillows or something.

No, there’s too much. Let me sum up.

Oh, hi, internet! I haven’t been the best sewing blogger as of late, but I think I can be excused since I’ve been busy with, oh, growing another human. I had all of these grand plans to make several patterns to get me through this upcoming summer, since I’ve never really had to do a hot weather third trimester before, buuuuut I’ve managed to sew about three things since that flannel shirt that I posted months ago. I also had grand plans to post actual pattern reviews now that I finally have a Pattern Review account again (I had to sign up all over, since I’ve more or less switched emails and could not get in with the old one), but all I’ve managed are a few phone photos, with my little photobombers in each one. So I’m going with the Princess Bride quote in the title, and just summing up the last several months at once.

20190329_150128First up, I made two pairs of maternity shorts, using the Copenhagen Harbor Board Shorts from Stitch Upon A Time. What I liked about this pattern is that the construction is such that, theoretically, I can just rip the stretchy panel off next summer, sew on a waistband piece, add some back elastic as per the instructions, and have regular old shorts. Whether that will actually happen is TBD. I did cut out the waistband pieces, but I ended up with some weird poofiness in the front crotch area and I suspect that the back rise isn’t high enough for me. I can probably fix the latter, since I have fabric left from both pairs, but I’m not sure about the front without taking a weird tuck out like I had to do with last year’s Lander shorts. Obviously, it’s too early to say, because the bump needs some room, so I guess I’ll have to wait and see next spring.

20190329_145915Fitting issues aside, this was easy to sew, and I was able to knock both pairs out fairly quickly, as I was physically able. Even with adding some extra jeans-like topstitching details. I used lightweight denim for both, with the navy pair having a slight amount of stretch. Now that it’s warm enough to actually wear them, I can say the non-stretch worked a bit better. These pictures were from when I was about 16 weeks in.

 

 

 

20190416_083107The second project was the Chalk & Notch Pony Tank, with the idea being that I can wear it now and later with no alterations. This one was more successful than the shorts, and the fabric makes me happy. If I’m going to feel like I’m carrying a small planet around all summer, I might as well have galactic fun with it! I did have some gathering issues with the neckband, which I think will be solved by not following the markings next time. And this was also the most successful coverstitch project I’ve had to date. (Turns out that I needed to change the needles, who knew?) This photo was from about six weeks ago, and I still have plenty of room left! I have a second one cut out, but haven’t sewed it yet, because I have another project currently in progress that I could use the same serger and coverstitch threads for. I think this will be a TNT pattern, though!

20190316_140530Finally, I did two hand-sewn refashions for the Day & Night dress challenge, hosted by Elizabeth Made This. I couldn’t handle much machine sewing at the time due to sickness, so I chose to turn my old Plantain cardigan hack into a vest with some Alabama Chanin style armhole bindings. I still like the original cardigan, but it had gotten too tight in the armpits since the kids came along, so this was my salvage attempt. (Which I haven’t worn since, but I’ve had maternity styling issues.)

 

 

 

For the night look, I turned a barely worn wrap that I made as one of my earliest knitting projects into a shrug/cropped jacket thing, by stitching up a couple of seams within the rectangle. This was a fun experiment in zero waste design for me, since the original wrap was just a rectangle of fabric and I didn’t want to cut into any fabric I had to make myself out of string! I also accidentally discovered that I can style it two ways, by either positioning the seams under my arms or on top of my shoulders. Even though the latter makes a kind of odd sleeve shape under my arms, I like the faux lapels that result. I’m very seriously considering dyeing it, most likely to teal, as the yarn is too beige for my taste. (It was purchased for an attempt at making a mini-wardrobe years ago, which was largely unsuccessful, but this yarn matched the main print that was the only two pieces that worked. I just have no idea how to style shawls.) As for this dress, it was a slight refashion as well– a RTW maternity dress that I shortened the sleeves on, since they were originally 3/4 length and I’ve realized over the past few years that this length is virtually useless in my climate.

I’m still hoping to get some more sewing in before the end of the summer. I’m currently working on a maternity/nursing dress that will hopefully be maxi (we’ll see, because I had some yardage issues), I have that second Pony tank cut and ready to go, and I’m trying very hard to get the vests for my guys made that I intended to make back in January. Though all I’ve managed so far is tracing the sizes for the boys, I still need to trace Doug’s. Ideally, I’d like to cut out a couple of the nursing-friendly projects that I got supplies for last Christmas as well, on the off chance that I actually manage some time to myself while juggling the newborn/toddler/preschooler combo!

We’ll see what I manage to do, since it’s been a rather rough pregnancy. Ok, so either all of my pregnancies have either been rough, or I’m a total wimp. Part of me feels like I shouldn’t complain, since I know plenty of people that have struggled with infertility or miscarriages. But it’s also hard to keep a happier perspective when I’m one week short of the third trimester and still getting nauseous multiple times a day (just like with my older son, when I didn’t stop being nauseous until the day after he was born), building 2 foot pillow forts and wearing nasal strips every night because I can’t breathe to sleep otherwise, and getting sent back to physical therapy because the hip that got misaligned last time is already going out again. Also, I’ve had to entirely give up tea for months now, due to the nausea. If you’ve been following me for any length of time, you know how I feel about tea. I’m totally packing some quality stuff in my hospital bag when the time comes!

On a positive note, baby is quite healthy…and we’re having a girl this time! Yes, I’ve already acquired some sewing patterns, and even cut out one little skirt from some of the leftovers from my current project. This is going to be great for my scrapbusting! (Not that I don’t love my boys, but they are admittedly harder to sew for, especially with my love of prints!) Even so, I’m thankful that a cousin passed on all of her summer maternity clothes to me/I have multiple friends who are willing to give us clothes that their daughters outgrew so I don’t have to stress about making or buying as many things right now. And counting down the weeks until this pregnancy is done.

 

the best-laid plans…

Oh, hi, internet! So you remember that great sewing plan I had for the winter? Well, it’s pretty much out the window by this point. The one thing I did manage to do out of my Seasonal Sew 3 was the Grainline Archer shirt that I’d already been putting off for 2 years, but wow, getting it to happen was a massive struggle.

The main reason? Guess what… pretty much as soon as I posted that plan, I found out that I’m pregnant again. And so far, this has mostly been a repeat of the first pregnancy where I was sick all the time, except now I’ve also got two active boys to watch, so I don’t have the luxury of spending extra hours nursing myself in bed. So between the nausea and the fatigue, I just haven’t had it in me to sew much at all so far this year. But I really wanted to try to get this shirt done while I still fit into the jeans that coordinate with this best (which ended up not happening), so here I am.

20190221_083824I did make a few changes, after a careful examination of my previous Archer. Like I added about 3/4″ to each seam on the hips, and I shrank down the sleeve cuffs because those last ones were ridiculous. I used a RTW flannel that I liked the sleeve fit on as a guideline, and ended up taking something like an entire inch out of the cuff, and then tapering the sleeves down from the seam allowance to fit. I can only push these up to a little below my elbow when buttoned now, instead of fully over it, so I think it went much better. While I feel like I could stand to add some length in here, as I like my shirts on the longer side, I’m overall much happier with the fit this time!

img_20190106_152940This shirt almost got derailed right at the beginning. I thought I was being very careful about the plaid matching, even cutting the front single layer and lining the second piece up with the first on the fabric. But somehow, it got shifted off just enough to be super obvious in the front. After some panicked Instagramming and some good suggestions (thanks, ladies!), I managed to salvage it by trimming a little off the shoulder seam on one side, and evening out the front hem. Somehow, the plaid still matched at the armhole and side seams, so I have no idea what happened, unless I just blame it on early pregnancy brain.

20190221_083903From there, it was pretty smooth sailing, for the most part. I suppose that being forced to slow down and really take my time with this shirt was not the worst thing in the world, since I was able to focus on being really precise. I did run out of thread just before the buttonholes, and discovered that Gutermann apparently changed the number codes, because the same number thread was not the same shade of teal at all! Thankfully, I suspected something was off in the store, and bought two more spools of other shades as backups. It’s not like I won’t use them at some point, since teal is basically a neutral for me. I think I probably could have made the buttonholes a little larger, but I can still button it all right. So even though this ended up taking the entire winter, at least I have a nice, cozy, nursing-friendly top for this fall! It’s the Robert Kaufman Mammoth flannel, in the “Lagoon” color, and it’s so thick and luscious. I want to make all my flannel stuff out of this now, even if the thickness did make some of the buttonholes a pain.

20190221_083900And at least the shirt itself fits, for now. The baby bump showed up pretty quickly this time, I guess because this is the third time, and I was forced back into my maternity pants around 8 weeks. I think I took these photos around 10 weeks, but it’s taken a little while to get some editing/writing time! So I’m right on the cusp of the second trimester now. Hopefully I’ll manage to get back into the mustardy gold jeans that I have by the end of the year, because I think they’d be great for styling with this shirt.

Coming soon: The new, revised sewing plan for the next few months. Because guess what… I actually legitimately need maternity clothes, believe it or not.

 

Summer pajamas, just in time for fall

Most of my August sewing time was dedicated to the continued restocking of my pajamas. My lightweight ones were getting particularly ratty, as they bore the brunt of both third trimesters and the most frequent nighttime nursing sessions. So I made myself two new sets, featuring some of my favorite things!

20180830_075432Since I’d already worked out the fitting adjustments for the Closet Case Carolyn pants back in the winter, I figured I’d keep rolling with that. Plus they have pockets. So I just copied the exact same backside adjustment when tracing out the shorts, and went for it for both pairs.

For the first set I finished, the most challenging part was forgetting to sew the back piece to the cuffs and having to unpick it. Oops. But it had also been awhile since I’d done a project with piping, so it was good to refresh my memory on how to handle that. The fabric is a quilting cotton that my mom gifted me last Christmas specifically for this purpose, with tea mugs all over.

20180830_075428The accompanying shirt is the tank version of the Sew Liberated Stasia tee, which I’d wanted to test anyway. I was hoping that I could have this one do double duty for wearing in public, since basic color tank tops are something I’ve found myself lacking in this summer. But alas, while this (rayon?) jersey knit is super comfortable to wear, it just didn’t have the right recovery, and adding the binding to the armholes stretched them out. You can see it a little better on the left side of the picture. Pajamas it is. That being said, I’m quite happy with the results otherwise, and will have to try this again with a less drapey knit. I think it just might be the basic tank pattern I’ve been looking for! I really seriously considered adding a stencil to the tee with a cute tea-related slogan, but it reached the point where I just needed to get it done.

20180831_090744For the second set, I made the Carolyn pajama top, which was new to me. It seems to fit very well straight out of the envelope (I made a size 14). The only changes I made were doing 4 buttons instead of 5 (I misplaced one during the sewing process and couldn’t find another in the stash to match), and swapping out the trim.

Flute pajamas close-up

When I went to Joann’s, they were completely out of white piping, and I didn’t want to spend my precious sewing time making plain piping. So I bought rickrack instead. It might have been too cutesy little girl on another fabric, but I think that it ended up complimenting my funky flutes well! The resulting scallops echoed the keyhole shapes in several flutes on the print very nicely.

20180831_090819Since this was a project I made in my mom’s sewing room and I didn’t want to rethread her serger, I did take the time on this set to finish the insides very nicely– French seams and hand stitching the facing to the shoulder seams and such. It’s another quilting cotton, and I was wearing this overnight before I took the pictures, which is why it’s a little wrinkled. It’s a very comfortable shirt to wear, though I generally prefer tees for sleeping. I’m actually quite tempted to try making one in a regular shirting fabric for everyday wear, though if I ever do that, I’ll definitely have to do something about that pooling in the back. The width across the back is good, though, so I don’t think it would be an issue for when I’m actually playing the flute and not just wearing them!

I’ve started my fall sewing now, but it’s still warm enough around here that I am getting at least some use out of these pajamas this season. I don’t think I’m quite done with this pattern yet, as I could use a pair of pajama pants that are lighter weight than flannel but warmer than shorts. But since I have other things to make that need to take higher priority, I seriously doubt I’ll get to it this year!

On a more personal note, since our two golden retrievers liked to photobomb me on here fairly regularly, it’s only fair to pay tribute to the one we had to put to sleep yesterday. The photo I have further up with the tea pajamas is one of the last ones I have of Malkin (the blonde retriever). We noticed back in April that he had a tumor growing on one of his front legs, but by that point, it was too late to try and do anything about it. So we’d just been trying to make him as comfortable as we could over the last several months. He took a turn for the worse this week, though, so it was time to end his suffering. He’ll be missed greatly, though, especially by Crosby (our redhead retriever) and Doug, who had both of the dogs before he met me. Rest in peace, boy.