Can I call it a chain…

…if there’s only 3 links?

I had grander plans for summer sewing and my Chain Reaction project. But in the end, I only finished three projects over the entire summer. The third, the Itch to Stitch Fortuna shorts, was mentioned in my last post. Today, to catch up, I’ll share the other two. (With some help from the toddler who refuses to let me get any project photos on my own.)

My first project, and the first one that I made for this intended chain, was the Shenanigans Skort from 5 Out of 4 Patterns. I ended up making this as part of her Facebook group’s sewalong. Since I already made this once before, last summer, it was a fairly quick project to knock out. The two changes that I made were adding some rise to the back, which worked well, and attempting to add in seam pockets. My thought was that it might give the overskirt more of a polished look than the patch pockets on last year’s black ponte version. That didn’t work as well as I’d hoped. I ended up having to go back after about two washes and understitching them by hand, because they were bagging out so badly. Also, the stress points were already developing holes. So I won’t be doing that again, but I am happy with the changes to the fit.

The second project was another from the Itch To Stitch Sew Beautiful book, the Prague top. This is me being very late to the cold shoulder trend, and I’m still not entirely convinced about how I feel about the look on me. That being said, it was a pretty easy sew, and the shirt is comfortable to wear.

How fun is this print? I picked it up in the juvenile section at Joann’s, actually, because I really wanted a great novelty print and couldn’t find anything in the boring adult fabrics. (I guess this was my midlife crisis shopping trip?) Truth be told, a big part of what drew me to it was that I knew my sons would love it if Mommy has a dinosaur shirt. And they do.

I made a size 12, graded to 14 in the hips. I also shortened the sleeves just a bit. Will I make it again? I’m not sure. But it was worth trying.

I had other plans — a second Santa Fe top, and a seafoam colored skirt to pair with the Prague tee. I had hopes of sewing a dress and jacket combo that I’ve been plotting for several years, too, with a small chain built off of that. But we ended up having an extremely busy summer with plans nearly every weekend, and lots of late weekday bedtimes with my kids struggling to go to bed before the sun. I don’t regret losing the weekend time to making memories during our “Summer of Fun”, as my husband dubbed it, especially after last year. Lots of beach time, water park time, getting to see extended family and friends that I hadn’t gotten to see in over a year was worth it. I could have stood to have more of my weeknight time back, but it’s just a season of life. I can revisit those next year, right?

Now I’m trying to shift gears into Halloween costume mode. It’s been a slow start, since we’re also getting our homeschool year going, and trying to juggle two students plus a toddler there. But I did pick up a couple of patterns to use as starting points, and some curtains from the thrift shop to use for materials. So hopefully I’ll have that rolling soon.

Well, that got away from me.

Oh, hi, September. I didn’t mean to take so much time off of here. Honestly, I realized about 2/3 of the way through the summer that I never hit publish on this post, as I’d meant to go back and try to get better pictures. Obviously, my life is not conducive to better pictures, so here I am just playing catch up with what I have.

I had decided to take a break from the chain reaction sewing in order to fill a badly needed wardrobe gap. During the temperature ping-pong match that is Mid-Atlantic spring and fall, I can sometimes get away with my flannel pants and sometimes get away with my shorts. But more often than not, I really just need some lighter weight pants! And all I had left in this category, after three pregnancies’ worth of stretching killed my RTW set, was a pair of falling-apart Sewaholic Tofino pants that I made during my newlywed year.

I had been intrigued by the Fortuna Pants in the Itch to Stitch Sew Beautiful book since I first saw them, because—confession time— even though I wear them pretty regularly around the house, I’m not a huge fan of the jogger style pants. Especially the ones with the cuff on the bottom, because they remind me of 1980s sweatpants. These, however, have a wide leg option, and that is what I decided to try out.

My fabric was a soft, stretchy jersey that I hacked in half lengthwise and made a wrap baby carrier out of for my firstborn. It didn’t get used much, because it was very cumbersome to tie up out of the house (like dragging on the parking lot), and I got a Moby wrap at a swap before my middle child came along. So I’ve had it stashed for close to 5 years. I made the size 12, with a few modifications. First, I added about an inch to the back crotch curve. The finished pants ended up rather high rise, so this probably wasn’t necessary, but it’s an adjustment that I often need. I also graded it in to a size 10 at the waist, which worked great. Finally, I modified the front to have the angled pockets of the jogger version, because I got spoiled by having pockets in the multiple Carolyn pants and shorts that I’ve made, and can’t go back to pocketless pjs.

Let me just say, these pj pants are super comfortable. I’m sure a lot of that is due to the fabric, but I’m really loving the wide leg. When I wear them, I can’t help feeling like I’m wearing glamorous 1930s loungewear instead of pandemic world stretchy pants. I also feel like, with the right fabric, these could be easily dressed up or down. Maybe some future orchestra pants, if I can find the right black knit? The one thing that I wasn’t entirely satisfied with were the pockets, since they bag out very easily when I put my phone in my pocket. But more on that later.

I had some of the baby wrap left over, so the next pattern I tried was Hey June Handmade’s Santa Fe top. I didn’t realize when I printed it that I was essentially assembling 6 complete patterns, so the prep took the last several nights of my 100 Days Project. But it was a quick sew! I knew I wanted sleeves on my pj top, so I only had enough of the jersey left for the contrast and piecing together the neckband. I paired it with a lightweight black jersey that I’d ordered in hopes of making a good basic black tee, but it’s not great in the opacity and recovery departments. Good enough for sleepwear, though!

I made a straight size L for this one, and believe I’ll be sticking with it for now. I did find the neckband a little unwieldy, mostly due to needing a lot more practice to do a decently straight edge stitch on my coverstitch machine. I’m guessing the sleeve bands were supposed to have similar construction and be half the width , but oh well.

Overall, I think both patterns are keepers, and have definite TNT potential. In fact, I’ve already made the Fortuna again, but as the shorts!

I did make a few little tweaks the second time. I wanted to give my pockets a little more stability, so I drafted a self-facing, and used that as a sort of lining/interfacing when I sewed them on. It’s not a perfect fix, but my phone does pull the pocket far less out of shape than in my pj pants. The binding was a little different as well, but that was more me accidentally sewing it on the incorrect side and then just rolling with it.

Finally, I made a faux cuff by basically flipping the hem to the outside. The fabric, a very soft French terry, is excellent for comfort, but the color combined with the style was giving me serious gym shorts vibes. So this was me attempting to be marginally more stylish than I’ve become. That being said, I’ve been wearing these quite often since I finished them. So, since I don’t have many shorts anyway, I think more will be in order when I have time and comfy fabric in more interesting colors and prints.

Chain Reaction 1, finished!

Since I didn’t manage to get pictures of my fourth finished piece before I finished my most recent project, I have two things to share today.

The first is a pattern that I’ve made before, the Stasia Tee by Sew Liberated. Since I’ve already talked about this pattern, I made it basically the exact same way as before, except I did add a little extra width to the lower section to compensate for the mom tummy that I’ve gained since the ivory version. I made a coral tee years ago, and it ended up being a surprisingly versatile piece in my wardrobe. But given that it was two kids and a quarantine ago, it isn’t fitting that well these days. So this one was to function as both a replacement for that, and a much needed pop of color in this particular chain.

I had quite a bit of this coral left over, so I did make a second little side project, which I’ll put in a different post soon.

The second project, and what I believe will be the last piece in this particular chain for now, was the Carlsbad Vest from the recently released Itch to Stitch book. As you know, I’ve become quite a fan of her patterns in recent years, and I can honestly say that I want to make every single pattern in this book! Which I haven’t been able to say about other pattern books that I’ve acquired in the past. To be honest, this vest wasn’t on my immediate radar, but I found a fabric during my birthday mini-shopping spree that I thought would be perfect for it. And since it happened to work with the pieces in this chain, I just went for it!

The fabric is a double-sided knit from Joann’s — black and white stripes on one side, and white dots on black for the reverse. Initially, I was wondering if I could make this fully reversible, but that’s a lot of flat-felling on a stretchy knit. So in the end, I decided it wasn’t worth the risk of rippling all the seams. I did think that the reversible quality would make for a fun contrast with the waterfall effect of the front, and I do believe it worked out well. I also ended up using the dotted side for the arm bindings — partially for the style, but also because this knit was surprisingly hard to cut straight and all of my stripes for those pieces ended up slanted!

I made the size 14– I probably could have done the 12, but I wanted to make sure that it wasn’t pulling over my hips. The instructions were really nicely done for the mitered corners and the collar, so I had no trouble sewing this together. Honestly, the part that took the longest was the hemming, since it’s on all four sides and the way the corners are constructed made me think that my coverstitch machine wouldn’t be the best finishing choice. I ended up doing a folded hem (as per the instructions), with a narrow zigzag and tear-away stabilizer. It worked like a dream, with nary a ripple in sight, except the ones that are supposed to be in the front from that long rectangular piece. I could see myself making this again as an alternate silhouette to the Blackwood Cardigan, with a nice drapey knit.

And now, here’s how all five pieces in this chain mix together! As a reminder, the other three patterns involved are the Itch to Stitch Mountain View Jeans, the Itch to Stitch Atenas Jeans Jacket, and the Paprika Patterns Jade Skirt.

So, six looks from five pieces, which I can likely mix up more with different shoes (though my choices are admittedly limited there), or jewelry. Especially once I get to the point where Miss Grabby Toddler lets me start using my necklaces and dangly earrings again!

Overall, I’m quite pleased with how this chain-style sewing experiment worked out! My plan is to take a brief break from that for another project (I very badly need some pajamas that are between flannel pants and summer shorts), but plans for the next chain are definitely in the works. And, of course, I’m fully planning on mixing these pieces in with other things in my closet/future sewing projects as much as possible!

The Atenas Jacket

I guess I’m on an Itch to Stitch kick, because the next piece in this wardrobe chain is the Atenas jeans jacket. I’ve been wanting to tackle this type of jacket for awhile, as I love the look of a denim jacket layered over spring/fall skirts and dresses. The blue denim one that I own has served me well, but the sleeves are obviously too short on me, as long sleeved RTW usually is. So I have to wear it with the sleeves rolled up as a 3/4 length jacket, which does somewhat limit its usefulness.

For this initial version, I made it from black denim that my mom gifted to me along with the pattern. After a great deal of debate, I made it in a size 10, C cup, graded to 12 in the hips. The result is quite fitted in my midsection if I button it, though not uncomfortably so. Honestly, though, I never button denim jackets, so it really doesn’t matter! And since my old basic black layering jacket finally got too worn and snug, it’s good to have a new replacement piece in my closet. (That old jacket lasted me for about 15 years, though –wait, have I really been writing this blog for that long?!)

Just ignore that all of my best shots have little limbs sticking out of odd places, ok? #momlife

Overall, the instructions on this were great. I was a little worried about the welt pocket, because the last time I made them was about 7 years ago, when I was binge sewing Sewaholic Thurlow pants. I did a little test run with some scraps, and it helped a lot. Really, the main problem that I had with this was that, despite double checking my sleeve against the pattern piece, I somehow managed to sew both sleeves in backwards, and didn’t notice until I tried it on. Which, of course, was already after I’d trimmed the seams and flat felled them! I had a little breakdown over that, but thankfully, the kids were content to watch tv and let me bust out my seam ripper, and I was able to get them fixed that same day. Not as nicely, to be honest, since I ended up just lining the cut edges up, serging them, and doing a much more narrow topstitch line. But it worked, and I still had the jacket done in time for my birthday, which had been the goal all along.

A few other details: I did the faux pockets on this one, as I was more concerned about the fit than the extra pockets. And though I cut out the tabs for the lower band, I ended up leaving them off the final jacket, since I wanted to be sure of the fit and I was getting pretty crunched for time by this point, even pulling hours of sewing each night last week to get it done by my self-imposed deadline! It’s just as well, since I would have needed 4 extra buttons for that, and it had also been awhile since I installed jeans hardware. But I only broke one button and I have a few spares of this type for whenever I get back into sewing jeans with an actual buttoned waistband.

I think I would make a few tweaks the next time, namely adding just a tiny bit more width across the upper back. It got more comfortable as I wore it that day, but it did feel a little snug initially, thanks to my killer flutist upper back muscles. I also need to add a little more length to the side pockets, because I don’t know if it’s the lining fabric I used, but it barely reached the folded front facing to get caught in that seam. I already have a vision in my head of turning the stack of jeans in my refashion pile into another one of these, though I’m definitely taking time off for some quicker projects before I tackle that!

To move on in the chain, I initially wanted to do a top, and will still likely come back to that. But after some brainstorming with my color savvy quilter mom about what would work with the pants that isn’t just a boring neutral, I realized I don’t have the right color in my stash. So that’s coming in the future, but in the meantime, I’ve started another bottom piece.

I also managed a nice little fabric shopping spree, thanks to a gift card from my in-laws at Christmas and some birthday money that I was given. So I bought myself 7 new pieces of fabric! One of them will actually work nicely for this particular chain, I believe, and several of the others will work well together for a warmer weather one. Though I generally love the fabrics that I get from my mom at Christmas, it’s been awhile since I was really able to pick out much for myself, so that was fun!

Grunge jeans

I finally finished my first piece of the year, and the first piece for my first chain reaction mini capsule! And there really isn’t any other way to describe this print, even if it does leave me singing Pearl Jam in my head. (Yes, I’m dating myself, but given that I have a milestone birthday coming up this month, it was pretty much inevitable.) This fabric had been sitting in my stash for at least 5 or 6 years because frankly, I didn’t know what to do with it. It was from one of my Christmas hauls that my mom often gives me, and while I like the print just fine, the fabric itself was a little strange, since it’s got this crazy amount of 2 way stretch that left me scratching my head about what pattern to use. (Seriously, if I did the math right, it’s something like 70-80%.)

I finally realized that it was a good candidate for a second iteration of the Mountain View jeans. And after last year’s closet purge, I was desperately in need of some pants that I felt ok about wearing in public. Especially because this whole crazy year has finally made me cave on the whole Yoga Pants Mom thing, given that homeschooling and having a toddler running around makes for a rather messy life. So this seemed like the perfect place to start.

I did make some changes from my first version. Initially, I took a wedge out of the back waistband to account for my perpetual swayback, and added about 1/4″ vertically to the waistband. I’m much more comfortable with this amount of rise than on the turquoise version, though I still wear those regularly. I did have the foresight to check the fit before doing any finished seams, thankfully. And I ended up taking out quite a bit — mostly in the knees down, since the fabric demanded a skinnier cut than I’d done last time, but I did also take an extra 1/8 or so on much of the rest of the vertical seams. I do wonder if I went far enough with that, particularly the back leg seams, but overfitting it and straining the fabric was something that I preferred to avoid.

I probably should have tightened up the waistband more, particularly on the elastic, as it is something that I have to adjust while wearing. I was trying to avoid the muffin top look, since that has become a little problem lately (thanks, quarantine 15), but I think I overcompensated. It’s not bothering me enough to do anything about it now, but I am anticipating/ hoping that I’ll need to adjust it in the future, given that I really am trying to build some sustainable healthier habits.

The last photo is how I styled it for its first public outing, going to church on a more wintry weather day. So I paired it with my latest Blackwood cardigan and a RTW top that’s basically the only solid black thing I own that isn’t sleeveless. (Definitely need to plug that wardrobe hole sometime.) I’ve already started the next link in the chain, which will be a jacket (also by Itch to Stitch, because her patterns just fit my current lifestyle so well!) I’m thinking a shirt to make it a complete outfit would be a good part 3. After consulting with my color guru (aka Mom the Quilter), I have an idea that would actually take care of something that needs replacing anyway. (Not the black shirt, not yet, I need some color with this!) But I don’t actually have fabric for that, so I’m hoping that Joann’s comes through for me. I have a gift card that my in-laws gave me for Christmas that needs using, and I’d like to get something besides just restocking on neutral threads and interfacing!

Finally, a quick note on my 100 Days Project! Today is day 17 of the project, and aside from not having a chance to do anything yet today, I’m proud to say that I have stuck with it so far. Since I’m starting with two projects that involve topstitching and all, it still feels like slow progress. But given that I probably sewed a total of 16 times or less over the course of 6 months last year, this already feels like an accomplishment. I’m probably averaging closer to 20 minutes a day rather than 15, but on nights when it’s taking longer to get my kids to bed (especially since my daughter is currently getting 4 teeth at once, why?!) or when Doug wants to hang out, it’s nice to feel like it’s ok to just sew a seam or two and stop. And so far, I’m not doing it at the expense of giving up digital scrapbooking, since that’s something I do more during the day, or reading, since I often do that on my Kindle while getting kids to sleep. I’m feeling good about this, and after last year, I think this was just what I needed.

The Chemainus Event

For my most recent finished project (finished in October, I just haven’t gotten around to adding the pictures until now), I did something unusual for me — I got so smitten by a newly released pattern that I bought it and sewed it up almost immediately. Or, at least what passes for immediately in my slow sewing world!

My one decent photo that I managed before the minions showed up…

The pattern is the Chemainus top, from Itch to Stitch. I think that by this point, I can safely call ItS my favorite current indie pattern company. It’s nice to have one again, since I haven’t fangirled so regularly over any pattern company since Sewaholic essentially vanished overnight. I’ve been wanting something along the lines of a loose woven tee for awhile, and this one caught my eye for both the pattern/ color blocking possibilities, and the nursing friendliness. (Of course, by the time I finished, Baby Girl was weaned! But I’m admittedly not sorry to be done with that life stage.)

Also pre-haircut, since by this point, I hadn’t managed one in about 13 months.

One thing that did slow me down a bit was that my finished top is my second attempt. I initially decided to play with this border print crepe that a friend gifted me with ages ago, thinking that it might work well to highlight the print. I was hoping that it would show more of the black, gray, and ivory. It didn’t work out that great, though. The polyester refused to hold a press for the neck binding, which made it quite fiddly. And when I tried it on, aside from sizing issues, all I could see was the taupe framing my face. Now, I have very strong feelings about taupe, and none of them are positive. So I called it a wearable muslin and moved on.

And the photobombing begins!

For my second try, I used a rayon challis that I’d bought for a dress years ago, but never got to. It’s probably for the best, because I would have had to fully line it if there had been a skirt involved, but as a top it doesn’t seem too sheer.

In the crepe version, I graded two sizes larger for the hips, based on my measurements. That turned out to be huge, so I slimmed it down approximately one size in the rayon. I ended up having to rip a large section of the side seams out and take it in even further. Also, oddly, the dart placement seemed fine in the first version, but I had to move it up nearly 2″ in the second one! (Which was admittedly good for my ego, after 3 rounds of breastfeeding.) That meant the top leg of the dart is basically in the armpit curve now, but it’s probably one of those things that only I notice when it’s on. It’s not affecting the comfort, so I’ll roll with it.

Overall, I like this pattern enough to keep playing with it, though that will likely wait for warmer weather plans. I think it’ll be a nice breezy style for wovens for our hot and humid days. And there’s definitely fun potential for stripe placement, though I botched that on this one. (Note to self, cut on the regular grain instead of the cross.) I think next time, I’ll do an entire size smaller overall, and check the dart placement again. I’m also considering both narrowing and shortening the placket. As it is, it’s ending at my navel, so I think it could benefit from going an entire button shorter.

I do have some leftover yardage that I need to figure out a plan for, too. I don’t think this will be a good candidate for a mommy and me look, given that my daughter has steamrolled into the toddler stage over the last few months, and a basically white dress would never survive her messy ways!

Just in time for early spring…

(Note: I wrote this post before the the pandemic stated shutting everything down, I just hadn’t had a chance to add the pictures. My computer time is currently very limited, as my husband is working from home, so I’m just doing the best I can to finish this on my phone. Stay well, everyone. (And stay home!)

I finished a snuggly flannel shirt that I may or may not get to wear again this season. (It’s been hovering in the 50s and 60s since the beginning of the month!)

The details: I cut a size 10 in the bust, with a DD cup size, and graded to a 14 in the hips. I’m having to accept that after 3 babies, this is just my new normal! I also added an extra inch of length to the sleeves, as has been my normal for pretty much my entire sewing life. I added an extra button to the placket, since 3 just was not enough for where I had to center it. Aside from that and the plaid matching, which was a minor fail on one sleeve, it was pretty straightforward. I do wish that I’d put the pocket lower, it looks oddly high on me (thanks, nursing and gravity), but I’m not bothered enough to take the time to move it.

The pattern is the Mila shirt, from Itch to Stitch, since I’m apparently fangirling over her patterns like I used to do with Sewaholic back in the day. It’s made from a rather cozy flannel plaid, I think maybe a Kaufman, but I’m not 100% sure since this was a Christmas gift from my mom during the massive stash build of 2018. I’m much more pleased with how my size guesstimate turned out here, since this was also a shirt that I cut out while pregnant.

I was really happy with her instructions overall. The bottom of the placket was a bit fiddly, and probably would have worked better in a thinner fabric, but the burrito yoke was magic. I’ve tried the technique before, but it worked so much better on this one. So much so, that I’m reusing the instructions to add a facing on my current project! I also really like how the collar turned out, and I’m glad that I used the sleeve tabs (also to be reused on the current project), as I think that will give me a better chance of wearing it into the spring. Really, my only true regret with this project is that it took me 6 weeks to get through it all, but that can’t be helped with my current limits. I think that once I get through the projects that I’m currently making, I’m going to have to seriously consider sewing a season ahead of the current one. Depending on my wardrobe needs, I may just skip the summer clothes this year and dive right into some fallish things!

A Fine Feathered Visby

My first 2020 project is in the books! This is the Visby Henley from Itch to Stitch. I’m hoping to start doing better at utilizing my Pattern Review account this year, so here’s my official review:

Pattern Description:
From the website: “The Visby Henley & Top will become your favorite wardrobe staple. Wear this long sleeve pullover by itself on a warm day, or as a base layer underneath a snuggly sweater on a cool night. The Visby comes as a classic henley, but you also have the option to add a hood or skip the buttoned placket altogether. You also have the choice to add a bottom band!”

Pattern Sizing: 0-20. I made a 14, graded to 16 in the hips.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it? Yes

Were the instructions easy to follow? Yes! The biggest struggle I had was with the placket, as the length ended up being over an inch off from where the slit was cut to. But that easily could have been user error rather than a drafting error, as having a baby around means I’m rather tired all the time.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern? What I like: The length of the shirt is great, especially for not riding up too far when I’m having to get down on the floor. The cuffs are a stylish touch, and overall, the shirt is very comfortable. As mentioned, I did have a small struggle with the placket, but since this shirt also has a plain front and a hoodie view, I don’t think that’s enough to stop making this one.

Fabric Used: Two fairly heavy cotton jerseys. I’m fairly certain the bird one is Art Gallery.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made: As mentioned, I did grade the hips out one size, and I also lengthened the arms about 1″ (a standard change for me). I also sewed the buttons on non-functionally, because once I realized that the placket wouldn’t look right if I made it deep enough to be nursing friendly, I didn’t want to bother sewing buttonholes into jersey.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others? Yes, and yes.

Conclusion: A nice wardrobe builder tee, with lots of potential for fun fabric mixing.

Now for a few unofficial thoughts:

  • I really do think I’d make this again, as I like the raglan style and don’t have much else in my wardrobe that fits that for a tee. But whenever I do get around to making a second one, I think I may size down in the bust and sleeves. I guessed at my sizing based on previous nursing-era measurements while I was cutting this out, since I was still pregnant at the time, and I do feel like it’s a little too baggy up top.
  • I know there’s a giant swayback puddling in the back, but that’s just my figure, and it’s not something that bothers me so much that I’m going to do a lot of fiddling with darts in a knit tee.
  • The disapproving-looking owl right there near the back makes me happy.
  • I really need to work on my model poses, don’t I? I actually had someone to take the pictures this time (my husband), and he was just snapping at random while I didn’t know when the pictures were being taken. Thus the “staring epically into the distance” pose, since it was honestly the best one.

Back on the jeans wagon!

Jeans have long been a defining staple of my style, and I’ve honestly missed making them (and wearing ones that fit) since the boys came along. So when I saw the Mountain View pull-on jeans by Itch to Stitch— and particularly a tester shot that showed off just how well they don’t gape in the back– I was sold. I haven’t been feeling ready to go through the fitting process for, say, the Ginger jeans that I’ve been hoarding, but elastic waist stretchy jeans? That, my mom bod can handle.

I do have to say, this took a lot longer than I expected. I actually started this project back in August, and intended all along to do a fit check before working on all of the details. But then I heard a Love to Sew podcast episode just after cutting it out where Brooks Ann Camper was talking about hand-sewing and not overly handling the fabric, and kind of on a whim, I decided to hand baste the jeans together. I still think it was the right move, as the denim I used was one that had been sitting in my stash for a few years because it was a lot lighter weight than I wanted. But it does have the 30% stretch that this pattern calls for, so I figured it would be the perfect test fabric. The machine basting and ripping out process probably would have weakened the fabric quite a bit, since I had to make some significant changes.20180917_085635

The back is where it’s the most noticeable. The dark stitching was the original seam lines, and the yellow is the changes I had to make. I ended up having to pull the back in about an extra 1/2″ starting from the back and going through the yoke, and then taking an additional dart in the waistband that is actually in the finished product. I’m going to see if I can smooth that out in future versions. I also ended up changing the rise slightly by reducing the seam allowance between the yoke and the waistband, and while wearing them and sitting down to write this, I think that was a good move.

Additional changes I made: I added a little extra width to the hips (about 1/4″ total, I think), and pulled it in around the knees to give it a little more of a flare effect– bootcut/flare jeans are still my favorite, and the straighter leg that this originally had just looked really baggy and ridiculous on me when I tried it on. A nice feature of these jeans is that there’s an additional back leg seam to help with fitting adjustments, so I was able to take it in at the back of my knee quite easily.

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Once I figured out the fitting changes and adjusted my pattern (look at me, being all smart and doing the adjustments right away, the actual assembly process went quite smoothly. Figuring out what to do with the pockets was a little tricky. I did all of the topstitching in the same color thread with the triple stitch, but I ended up deciding on a design from one of the templates in a free download from Closet Case Patterns. I’ll be honest, the pockets were my one quibble about the instructions for this pattern. The order of assembly on there has the pockets as the last thing, after the legs are all stitched together and the waistband is on, and that seems unnecessarily difficult to me. I went ahead and sewed them just after the center back leg seams, before doing the crotch or inseams or anything, but I can see that being a tricky point if you’re more of a novice in sewing pants.

So are you ready to see the results?

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20181120_080711  Here you go! Overall, I’m pleased with the fit, though I think that maybe I should have made the elastic just a little bit smaller. We’ll see if it ends up bothering me enough to remove the waistband and fix it later. They’re actually quite comfortable for a high rise pant, and the elastic content means it won’t restrict my breathing (crucial when your instrument is a woodwind!)

 

 

 

The back view. I think that in the future, I might move up the back pockets about a half inch or so, because they seem just a little low to me. But look at the flare!! The back seam blends in really well here due to the tone on tone stitching, but I can see that being a fun detail to highlight.

I would definitely make this pattern again, and am now curious about some of the other patterns from this designer. She has some really lovely tops! I do have one other piece of denim in my stash, in the more typical indigo color, that seems to have the right stretch amount for this pattern. But it’s also more narrow than the typical denim, so I’ll have to see if I can tetris it out. Honestly, I think that is probably the most difficult part of this pattern, aside from just working out the fitting– finding the right fabric! It seems like most denims cap out at around 15% stretch, and with the nature of the wide elasticized waistband, I’m not sure that just sizing up a little would be sufficient. So I may have to branch out to some corduroys and twills to see what I can do.

For the record, I’m still planning to try those Ginger jeans at some point, once I’m certain that we’re done with kids and my weight is stable. But this works well to give me my fix now. And I think that the color will help to brighten up my winter wardrobe very nicely! (Now I just need some print tops with this color, because how do I not have this happy turquoise?!)

Also, the other reason that these jeans took longer than expected is because I took a break in the middle, which is not typical for me on a project. But the opportunity came up to write a post for the Sewcialists blog’s Sustainable Sewing theme, which went up yesterday. So if you want to see my latest Refashion Redemption Project piece, go check it out!